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Van Gogh, Einstein and Co prove all geniuses have a hot streak

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Van Gogh, Einstein and Co prove all geniuses have a hot streak

The unrecognised genius toiling away in obscurity should keep the faith and struggle on, for their time will inevitably come, a study suggests.

Considering the work of scientists, artists and film directors, it found a ‘hot streak’ happens in almost every career.

These periods tend to last around five years during which those experiencing them have a string of successes beyond anything they have achieved before.

The study cited Albert Einstein in 1905, when he finished three papers in three months that would radically change the way we think about space and time.

Considering the work of scientists, artists and film directors, a study found a ‘hot streak’ happens in almost every career (including that of Van Gogh, pictured)

Considering the work of scientists, artists and film directors, a study found a ‘hot streak’ happens in almost every career (including that of Van Gogh, pictured)

It noted Vincent Van Gogh’s year of blockbuster paintings in 1888, when he produced Sunflowers, Van Gogh’s Chair (pictured) and Starry Night Over The Rhone

It noted Vincent Van Gogh’s year of blockbuster paintings in 1888, when he produced Sunflowers, Van Gogh’s Chair (pictured) and Starry Night Over The Rhone

Considering the work of scientists, artists and film directors, a study found a ‘hot streak’ happens in almost every career. It noted Vincent Van Gogh’s year of blockbuster paintings in 1888, when he produced Sunflowers, Van Gogh’s Chair (right) and Starry Night Over The Rhone

More recently, film director Peter Jackson’s (above) hot streak – defined as a period when someone’s performance is ‘substantially better’ than usual – came with his Lord of the Rings trilogy from 2001 to 2003

More recently, film director Peter Jackson’s (above) hot streak – defined as a period when someone’s performance is ‘substantially better’ than usual – came with his Lord of the Rings trilogy from 2001 to 2003

More recently, film director Peter Jackson’s (above) hot streak – defined as a period when someone’s performance is ‘substantially better’ than usual – came with his Lord of the Rings trilogy from 2001 to 2003

It also noted Vincent Van Gogh’s year of blockbuster paintings in 1888, when he produced Sunflowers, Van Gogh’s Chair and Starry Night Over The Rhone.

More recently, film director Peter Jackson’s hot streak – defined as a period when someone’s performance is ‘substantially better’ than usual – came with his Lord of the Rings trilogy from 2001 to 2003.

The study cited Albert Einstein in 1905, when he finished three papers in three months that would radically change the way we think about space and time

The study cited Albert Einstein in 1905, when he finished three papers in three months that would radically change the way we think about space and time

The study cited Albert Einstein in 1905, when he finished three papers in three months that would radically change the way we think about space and time

The study was led by researchers at the Kellogg School of Management at Northwestern University in the US who considered the work of 3,480 artists, 6,233 film directors and 20,040 scientists.

Looking at the prices that artists’ works fetched at auction, directors’ ratings on the Internet Movie Database website and scientists’ citations in academic journals, they found almost everyone had a hot streak.

But the study, published in the journal Nature, suggests lightning rarely strikes twice. It found almost two-thirds of artists, four out of five directors and 68 per cent of scientists had only one hot streak.

Co-author Dr Dashun Wang told university magazine Kellogg Insight: ‘If we know where your best work is, then we know very well where your second-best work is, and your third, because they’re just around the corner.’

The study found hot streaks happen at random, with no predicting when they will come. ‘If you keep producing, maybe your biggest work is yet to come,’ said Dr Wang.

He added his hope for the future had been ‘doubled’ by the fact that almost everyone gets a run of success. This was the case for 90 per cent of scientists, 91 per cent of artists and 88 per cent of directors.

Source: MailOnline | Copyright © MailOnline, All Rights Reserved

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